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View Full Version : Tunngle : the alternative to Hamachi



DragonsLover
April 15th, 2010, 05:17
I don't know if some of you have heard of Tunngle. It's a program similar to Hamachi that creates a virtual local area network (LAN) online using the P2P.

By checking over YouTube, I found this:

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This video is recent by the way, it's been a few weeks it's online.

Maybe it could be interesting to try this out someday.

The little downside: by using Serial Cable, it only supports 2 players.

Metal Gear Rex
April 15th, 2010, 05:32
Really nice find DL! :D

2 players? No matter, AI is no joke in DK1! :)

I'd like to try this with someone else. This is where I really am good! If you thought I was good in DK2... heh heh... prepare to get owned! XD

Krizzie
April 15th, 2010, 08:33
Nice indeed! But the game ran slow as hell as far as I could see from the video...

kyle
April 15th, 2010, 09:14
Yea like krizzie said, it appears you get lag anyway :(

dotted
April 15th, 2010, 09:16
Yea like krizzie said, it appears you get lag anyway :(

well we dont know his setup, so that just might be the problem as he might have used wifi

kyle
April 15th, 2010, 09:21
I don't know if you know but Dungeon Keeper I is very hard to play on multiplayer without getting lag. Although you could be right and I would certianly like to have a test game with somebody.

Krizzie
April 15th, 2010, 09:47
I have played the game over lan many times and it ran much smoother than this. Not as smooth as the singleplayer, but smooth enough to play a good game. Even with 4 players on crappy Pentium 1 pc's with a 10mbit lan it ran better than this, and yes I've done that. ;)

Metal Gear Rex
April 15th, 2010, 17:11
I have played the game over lan many times and it ran much smoother than this. Not as smooth as the singleplayer, but smooth enough to play a good game. Even with 4 players on crappy Pentium 1 pc's with a 10mbit lan it ran better than this, and yes I've done that. ;)

Damn, I need more Pentium 1 computers :P

I actually have just a Pentium 2 one, it is the only one. :(

P_Hansson
April 24th, 2010, 04:50
DK's network code is fairly archaic and you can't avoid the lag I think.

The game loops the multiple PCs run must run in perfect sync (clients may not be delayed after server); each game frame must occur at same time across all PCs. Having to do this at least 25 frames per second for smooth animation is challenging as it leaves less than 1000 ms / 25 frames = 40 ms/frame for exchanging information until next frame. Thus the game will stutter horribly unless you're very close geographically. My guess is you simply can't play a non-laggy game unless your ping to host is 10-15 ms or less.

So it works well on a 10 meter serial cable operating at a few Kbit/s (or what it was back in those days) rather than at a 100 Mbit/s broadband connection sending data 5000 km.

Unfortunately we can't increase speed of light. :)

Krizzie
April 24th, 2010, 09:10
Light isn't the problem, it's the jumps the packets make to get from A to B, each router they encounter (not just the one at home) gives a little (or big depending on the load) increase in delay.

But even on a <1ms gbit lan the game doesn't run as smooth as the single player.

P_Hansson
April 24th, 2010, 10:12
Regardless, I've never seen such a bad protocol. :p But then again I haven't had to deal with such old games before.

By the way, the speed of light does matter; especially if sending data from Australia to Europe or some such. Considering a light ray only can travel around 7 times in one second around the globe... :) I guess it influences electronics as well but I can't remember my physics lessons...

dotted
April 29th, 2010, 22:39
Regardless, I've never seen such a bad protocol. :p But then again I haven't had to deal with such old games before.

By the way, the speed of light does matter; especially if sending data from Australia to Europe or some such. Considering a light ray only can travel around 7 times in one second around the globe... :) I guess it influences electronics as well but I can't remember my physics lessons...

Well the problem is not the speed of light itself, but the speed atwhich you can convert a light signal to an electrical signal thats the bottleneck as i understand it.

If there was a direct optical link between Australia and Europe without any hope in between you'd probably be able to play on australian game servers with the same amount of lag as on any other european server - well almost anyways, as the light itself still need it's time to travel down under.

The is also why a pure optical computer would be interesting because the bandwidth and the response time would be insanely fast.